A Little RTW Budget… How Much Does it Cost to Travel the World for a Year? (2017)

A one-year budget breakdown of costs to travel the worldThe single most frequently asked question I get about my travels concerns the cost of budgeting for a solo round the world trip. While understanding how I pay for it all tops the list of questions, the actual cost of traveling for a year around the world is the big unknown. I had no idea how much my RTW trip would cost when I left — some people reported around $10,000 (which seemed absurdly low) while others spent upwards of $40K to travel a bit more luxuriously. So I thought of it as a grand adventure. How much will it cost, and how long can I keep going with my freelance income?

Over that year, I tracked every single dollar I spent on the road.

My full tally is complete and I traveled around the world for for 328 days (11 months) through 15 countries and tracked what I spent, what each and every country cost, and where I could have done better.

Just want the cold hard figures? Navigate the Google spreadsheet by the countries listed at the bottom of my full RTW Travel Budget.

How did I save for around the world travel?

Jumping at the Taj Mahal

While admission to the Taj was pricey, everything else in India was crazy cheap. I spent less for seven weeks in India than I did for one week in Italy. And guys… it’s the Taj! It ranks up there as one of the cooler travel experiences out there.

I have answered incarnations of this question dozens of times. The real question is this: “Traveling the world is expensive, how could you have possibly afforded it?”

It’s not as expensive as you assume, and most anyone reading this post has the ability to save for travel if it’s a true priority. As regular A Little Adrift readers have surmised, I don’t live off of a trust fund. My family is quite poor and I made it through college on merit-based scholarships. Instead of counting on help from family, I budgeted for the trip. I sold my couch, my clothes, my cups. I sold my car too, and I saved ruthlessly in the countdown months. I took on side-work to sock away money, and then, I worked on freelance SEO from the road for the entire year. And through all that, I came to the same conclusions as those backpackers who have adventurously gone before me: RTW travel is cheaper than you think! 

I am not saying it’s dirt cheap, but compared to my life in LA with $1200+ going to rent and bills each month, I used that same online income to travel the world, and I dug into my small savings to pay for the long-haul flights. I wasn’t sure how much my trip would cost when I left to travel, and there just wasn’t the information out there like there is now. Now you can play with your route and your travel style and come up with a tally in just a few hours. In fact, I believe so much that your dream trip is affordable that I wrote the budget guide and spreadsheet to help you price out your dream trip — it’s priced low so that there is no reason not to see how much you need to save.


 

Cost of My One Year Round the World Trip

Now, onto my travel budget!

I documented every single expense from my initial year-long RTW trip with meticulous care. My obsession with accurately tracking my expenses is epic but in the five years since I originally posted this breakdown, other backpackers have loved the precise and exact breakdown of just how much I spent throughout a year of active world travel. And five years later, even with rising global food costs, they are still traveling strong on similar budgets.

Total: USD $17,985

You’re shocked right now, I know, I sprang it on you out of nowhere! Close the gaping jaw.

That’s it?!

lakes-district england

This is how excited I was at the tail-end of my round the world trip when I was in England and I realized I had pulled it off. I had just one month left on the road at that point.

Travel was my bootcamp for life. This trip was the single best investment in both my personal growth and my career. Throughout life we are presented with a series of choices — each has the ability to help us create the life we want to have lived. I am forever glad I chose to travel this big beautiful world.

That figure. A mere $17,985 is fully and completely inclusive of everything from getting jabbed in the arm for my Yellow Fever vaccine to buying all of my pre-travel gear, my travel insurance,  all of my plane flights, bus rides, camel safaris, surfing lessons, zip-lining adventures in the Laos jungle, and straight through to my first delicious sub back on home soil when I passed through Philly on my final layover of the trip.

What does that number not include? Personal choices that upped the price bit: an external hard drive for photo storage, new camera (old one was waterlogged in Australia), and I rented a car alone in Ireland (most backpacker budgets wouldn’t allow for this so I included my car’s petrol to approximate the cost of public transportation for three weeks). My personal total, inclusive of all of that, was just under $19,000… so it’s still a bargain considering I was on the road for nearly an entire year. And again, I stress, this is thousands less than my annual expenses living in Los Angeles, California.

But lest you think it’s an anomaly, know that I have tracked cost of living around the world. If you’re considering a slow trip, I documented how I lived in places like Thailand for less than $600 per month, and Mexico for under $800.

What else contributes to a RTW trip budget?

  • Your route and speed around the world. This is the single biggest indicator of how much you will spend. Minimize the number of flights you need to take by traveling overland and slowly and to fewer places. Seriously, we all have a dream list, but if you’re on a limited trip (as opposed to open-ticket, no planned return RTW travels) then you’ve likely over-packed your route. The best advice I received on my RTW was to cut out 5 of the 17 planned countries–reflecting back on it, I can’t even imagine where they would have fit?!
  • Which countries you visit. If you add in developed countries like Europe, the United States, and Australia you will see your daily budget more than double (instead of $30/day in SEA and India, you’re looking at $75-$100/day in the UK, and Western Europe). Weight your trip heavily in favor of developing regions of the world – there’s a lot you’re already going to miss as you travel through, and I guarantee you won’t be bored spending a few extra months going more slowly. 100 % guarantee.
  • The food you eat and style of travel. How you eat on your travels impacts the bottom line; eat locally and at the street food stalls when you find them (rampant throughout Southeast Asia, India, Central America, etc)—they’re perfectly safe as long as you find the food stalls the locals are using too! Western food is more expensive and rarely actually tastes good anyhow. Local food is a window into the culture, so dig deep and eat like the locals, asking the vendors questions and learning more about each country’s food peculiarities. Also, when traveling in Western countries, shop for groceries and cook at the hostel at least two meals per day to limit costs! For more food travel tips, check out the Food Traveler’s Handbook one my my good travel friends wrote about safe, cheap street eats.

Let’s dive into the good stuff. The following tables and charts further outline my RTW budget including the country-by-country expenses. And because I just had to go that extra mile, I share a complete-down-to-the penny budget too. This budget spreadsheet includes every single expense itemized out in an absolutely gorgeous Google spreadsheet if I can toot my own horn for a moment!

Don’t forget to check out the well-loved Travel Planning Resources. And consider using the blank, formatted spreadsheet to log your own RTW travel budget (this is a Google Spreadsheet, either save a copy of this to your own drive for editing, or download as an excel file!).

RTW Travel Budget Breakdown

Total Costs to Travel the World for a Year

Travel Expense Cost (USD$)
Flights $3,577.40
Lodging $3,130.77
Food $2,820.11
Activities + Entertainment $3,613.18
Transportation $1,943.43
Misc (internet, gifts, extra gear, etc) $1,753.67
Visas $230
Pre-Trip Travel Gear $484.50
Vaccines $$606
Extra Costs $493.33
      TOTAL $18,588.39

 

* Lodging: Includes all accommodation; I couchsurfed in a few countries and stayed with friends a couple of times.
* Food: Includes everything from three meals a day, to snacks, and funding my chocolate obsession.
* Entertainment: Going out on the town, sharing beers with friends — this will be much higher if you drink often. My budget was for drinking on average once a week.
* Activities: Includes my volunteer program and all tours, trips, and group adventures. Everything from diving to ziplining to visiting temples and museums.
* Transportation: This total excludes flights, but covers all intra-country transportation like buses, trains, taxis and tuk-tuks.
* Misc: A large portion is the internet, it was pricey to make sure I had a strong connection for my work. Also includes shipping things home, gifts, and toiletries along the way.
* Flights: Includes many puddle-jumper little flights between countries in the same region. I did not use a RTW ticket, but instead booked along the way.

RTW Budget Daily Costs & Total Costs Per Country

My Average Daily Budget for Each Country on my RTW Trip RTW Expenses, Listed by Country and Number of Days

**These totals do not include flights, travel gear, and other misc pre-trip expenditures, only my actual on-the-road costs.

How to Much Will YOUR Dream Trip Cost?

Traveling the world is a mental obstacle as much as a financial one. Every situation is different, but I truly believe that if you are ready to truly prioritize travel, then it’s possible to plan and execute a round the world trip. The problem is, there’s crappy information out there about how to make it happen. Many bloggers have shared posts with a handful of tips about how much they saved for their dream trip, but they don’t break down how they arrived at that final figure. You may read this information and see my budget, but it leaves you wondering if your own travels would cost the same.

For that reason, I wrote two entire guides to address your current hurdle. One is about creating a realistic anticipated budget for your trip. The other is about saving for world travel.

BUDGET

How much will your dream trip cost? I wrote this guide to specifically answer the most common question I was emailed by readers: how much will a specific route/itinerary costs. In it, I share comprehensive and thoroughly practical advice about understanding trip budgets and understanding your own style of travel. The guide is a full treatise on how to estimate what your dream trip will cost and it includes case studies from other long-term travelers who tracked their trip budgets.

I’ve spent eight years on the road, and nearly that long talking with with other travelers about how they budget for travel. Using the aggregate of their knowledge and experience, I’ve outlined a road-map to taking a long-term trip. I wrote this guide to empower travelers and travel dreamers anywhere in the world with the tools to plan their trip. The guide breaks down average traveling costs for the world’s most traveled destinations, which you can use with the fully customizable Trip Budget Worksheet to create an accurate anticipated budget for your dream trip.

Aailable on Kindle, ePub, and PDF.

How Much Does It Cost to Travel the World?

Buy it for $9

SAVE

True wealth is having the freedom to do what you want with your life. Many travel dreamers get waylaid by the financial side of life. If you’re new to personal finance, or lost about how to start saving for a big goal, this book distills hard-learned information into easily actionable steps specifically targeted at giving travel dreamers tools to become financially literate.

This book provides a thorough deep-dive into the principles of saving money, common obstacles, overcoming debt, and the tenets of strong personal finance. It offers a streamlined process to create substantial changes in your financial life. If money is your primary obstacle to leaving on a long-term trip, this guide breaks down exactly the shifts you can make to change your financial situation. Many travelers look at my adventures and experiences these past eight years that I’ve traveled and they dream of also traveling through the cultures, stories, and conversations. This guide gives you the tools to move the needle from dreaming to doing.

Available on Amazon Kindle or as a PDF bundle with the budget book.

save for world travel ebook

Buy them both for $13


Resources & Further Research for World Travelers

It’s easy to see the numbers, be inspired for a bit and then never take action. If you’re actively planning your RTW — fantastic! There are a few more essential resources below that will help you plan your trip. If you’re currently working, studying, or just dreaming of traveling, I have resources for you as well. And if you want a second look at those spreadsheets, visit my full RTW budget as a Google Document that will open in your browser. Or head to the blank spreadsheet to track your own expenses as you travel around the world. You can save an editable copy of these to your own Google Drive, or download for your own use.

World Travel Budgets

Plan Your Own Trip

  • How Much Will My RTW Trip Cost? (Available on Kindle or as a PDF)I wrote this guide to help travelers determine an exact figure they should save before leaving for long-term travel. It’s all of the budgeting and cost-planning information in one spot, with travel budget case studies, detailed worksheets, and specific averages for the daily budget in dozens of countries around the world.
  • How to Save for World Travel (Available on Kindle): This guide outlines the common hurdles people face when saving for big goals, and then sets a roadmap to financial fitness. This guide teaches you how to save, and it will give you a myriad of new ideas to top up your travel fund. Nearly $20k is a huge sum for most people, but it’s a doable sum too. It really is. Mental and psychological hurdles often play a factor in saving and learning how to budget, so this guide provides a streamlined approach, as well as further resources to maintain the strong savings habits that will allow you to travel the world.
  • Free World Travel Resources: This is a a full treatise on all the answers you need to plan and execute the planning of a RTW trip. It’s everything that you might find overwhelming, plus a few things you forgot to worry about. Includes what to pack, how to purge your belongings, picking travel insurance, handling your period on the road, and more.

On-the-Road Travel Resources

  • How to Travel the World on $50 a Day. Published by Penguin and now in its second edition shows you how to stick to a budget while you’re traveling. It’s an guide for travelers new to budgeting on the road and weighs heavily toward backpacker-style travel with tips and hacks to save money by using travel cards, points, etc.
  • Plan amazing activities on the road. Use the ALA Travel Guides for comprehensive information on what to know before you go in each place. The guides and stories share my favorite experiences on the road, as well as plenty of tips for traveling responsibly. And Grassroots Volunteering is ALA’s sister site, offering a database of responsible travel companies and volunteer experiences all over the world.
  • Slow down somewhere and live somewhere fascinating. Use these posts on the Cost of Living Around the World to discover that it’s likely far more affordable to live elsewhere than you’ve ever considered. You can sometimes stretch your trip by months or years by stopping in places for a few months and digging into the local culture and way of life. I’ve done this everywhere from Mexico to Thailand and it’s allowed me to stay on the road and see these places in a new light.

Working on the Road

  • How to Start a Travel Blog: Many travelers find value in starting a travel blog to record the highs and lows of their once in a lifetime trip. I wrote a no-nonsense page detailing the process. It focuses on five quick and simple steps, and offers a realistic perspective on you can expect from your blog without the hype you find on some tutorials. While I don’t suggest professional travel blogging for most travelers, running a travel site for friends and family is a fun way to share your big journey — it’s an electronic scrapbook of memories and moments and stories.
  • Find Freelance Work & Work from the Road. Since money is a huge factor for many travelers, I have a resource page dedicated to working online. I’ve worked from my laptop for more than a decade and there are many jobs that also allow you to work from anywhere in the world.

I truly believe that world travel is possible for most people. When and how is unique to each person, but by prioritizing and planning travel, you can make a round the world trip possible. If you’re on the fence about making the huge decision to travel, read this. And if it’s months or years before you leave, why not read a few of my favorite classic travel books.

If there is ever anything that I can do to help, please do reach out on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram and let’s talk about how we can make your travel dream a reality. 

~Shannon

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332 Responses to A Little RTW Budget… How Much Does it Cost to Travel the World for a Year? (2017)

  1. JT June 9, 2014 at 4:22 pm #

    I have always dreamed of traveling around the world however, I do hesitate to travel alone although I’d much prefer to travel solo then accompanied. I worry about the safety hazards involved when traveling alone as a female. Did you run into any trouble that could of been avoided had you been with someone? Have you also got any places that you would recommend visiting that you particularly enjoyed?:)

    • Shannon O'Donnell June 9, 2014 at 4:34 pm #

      Hi Jodi, the safety question is a big fear for many travelers — I wrote a piece about it here: http://alittleadrift.com/2013/06/solo-female-travel-safety/ that covers some of the issues (very few) I’ve had on the road and my thoughts on some of the fears that hold people back from traveling. For solo travelers, I recommend Southeast Asia as an easy and very safe region to travel within with a large and developed network of backpackers to make friends with. Hope that helps! :)

  2. Brokepinkbloke.com May 10, 2014 at 2:07 pm #

    Thanks for the amazing budget spreadsheet! I’ll update my own and share it with my (non existent) readers. :D Your site has been a huge help while planning my own RTW-trip.

    • Shannon O'Donnell May 10, 2014 at 2:23 pm #

      So glad it was helpful! Safe and happy travels, hope you have an amazing trip. :)

  3. Jay March 6, 2014 at 2:31 am #

    Not to be negative, but how can you say you traveled the world and you didn’t hit every continent. No Africa, no pyramids, no wildlife preserves, no Maldives nor Madascagar?

    I’ll give it TP you for doing on the cheap, but how comfortable, and furthermore, how safe where you as an American female travelling abroad.

    I have been to over 30 countries and couldn’t imagine doing the globe that cheap.

    • Shannon O'Donnell March 6, 2014 at 2:48 am #

      Hitting every continent is a pretty specific definition of traveling the world I went around the world for a year, this budget back in 2008-2009, and five years later I am still traveling and haven’t seen it all (if you follow me, you know I just made it to Africa for four months overland and yes, solo). I tend to go overland and slowly, and I travel in more developing regions so it’s cost effective. So this was actually a doable budget for most anyone willing to stay in budget accommodation and go slowly, plane flights are the priciest part of travel.
      The hangups on a woman traveling solo isn’t something I have, I wrote about it here if you’d like to know more about the realities of that side of traveling. http://alittleadrift.com/2013/06/solo-female-travel-safety/

      Cheers and thanks for commenting — have a look around the site and perhaps you’ll understand how and why I travel like I do! :)

  4. Ultan Breslin January 22, 2014 at 1:50 am #

    Why was Cambodia so expensive? Did you go to Vietnam and malaysia? any clue of the per day costs of those 2 places.

    • Shannon O'Donnell January 22, 2014 at 10:59 am #

      I volunteered there for a bit, and that could have added some. Plus Angkor Wat is not cheap to buy the three day pass. It’s worth it, but some of the activities in Cambodia made the cost jump up a bit. I have traveled through Malaysia and I have friends living in Vietnam — these costs will be similar to what I experienced and somewhere between the Laos and Cambodian expenses. Malaysia a bit more expensive, and Vietnam about the same. Safe travels!

  5. Fahad January 21, 2014 at 9:06 pm #

    It’s been my life long dream to tour the world, and I’m sure my college fees would cost more that a life-changing trip. Definitely saving up!

    • Shannon O'Donnell January 21, 2014 at 9:28 pm #

      Good luck saving up, I did find it worth the year’s expenses. Let me know if I can ever help with advice! :)

  6. James January 21, 2014 at 9:01 pm #

    Thanks, really good info

  7. ra December 26, 2013 at 6:45 pm #

    wow thank you!

  8. mhendry December 15, 2013 at 4:19 pm #

    how come so much free accom. in scotland

    • Shannon O'Donnell December 15, 2013 at 4:50 pm #

      I stayed with friends that I had met earlier in the trip, there were a bunch of Scots on the road so it made that country heaps cheaper, and heaps more fun too!! :)

  9. Nikki K December 12, 2013 at 4:51 pm #

    Wow. I’d just like to say, you are my hero! My best friend and I are planning a RTW trip, and this helps so much. You give so much good advice and show that it really is possible. Thank you for the inspiration <3

    • Shannon O'Donnell December 12, 2013 at 5:31 pm #

      So glad you found the information useful! And please don’t hesitate to shoot me an email when you are planning if there is something I can help you with :)

  10. Dana December 1, 2013 at 10:26 am #

    WOW. I am in the beginning stages of thinking about ATW, and this information will be extremely helpful. Thank you!

  11. krishna November 9, 2013 at 3:47 pm #

    its a good thing, i wish i had a habit of doing that

  12. gagan deol October 13, 2013 at 6:20 pm #

    this is really the most helpful budget article across internet for RTW trips. I am leaving in January next year and this article will be helping me prepare for my trip. I want to know where will I lead my career. I mean to ask that can I make money through adventures and travels after I return back home. please do reply.

    • Shannon O'Donnell October 14, 2013 at 11:48 am #

      I am so glad you found it helpful! The amounts are a bit out of date, but it is an accurate assessment of the rough costs at least. And if you didn’t see it, Jodi from Legal Nomads has a great compilation of other budget posts here http://www.legalnomads.com/wds if there is a region I didn;t cover that you plan to visit.

      For working on the road, I have a big section of the site that has ideas for that very conundrum! http://alittleadrift.com/rtw-travel/#money

      Safe travels and let me know if I can help in any way. :)

  13. Matthew G. Bailey February 26, 2013 at 2:26 pm #

    It’s so true. We just got back from SE Asia and including thousands of dollars for scuba diving, 20 flights, the return flight from canada to bangkok, and 10 months of travel, was $15K. Bam!

    • ShannonOD February 26, 2013 at 3:06 pm #

      15K is great for 10 months, particularly if you did a lot of diving! Nicely done, I really wish I had done more diving on my trip (I only managed it in Australia) but I’m impressed that you stayed at the 15K mark for all that time on the road! Location is everything, and it’s one of the reasons I love SEA :)

  14. Matthew Hutchins October 1, 2012 at 5:41 am #

    Wow you sure did spend a lot while in the Czech

    • ShannonOD October 1, 2012 at 9:02 am #

      I was getting burned out by the time I got to Czech, so I found a nice place to stay and hunkered down for a bit. Then, I booked my flights on the wrong day out of Prague and extended my stay by another couple days on accident! Always something! It’s a pretty country though, and good beer :)

  15. elvina09 July 14, 2012 at 5:56 am #

    This
    concept is very interesting, you have added in this concept travel budget. Thanks
    to given to this info.

  16. Renata July 11, 2012 at 1:17 pm #

    Hi Shannon. Thanks for all of the information you shared on your blog. It’s probably the most detailed blog out there on RTW travel. I would like to know approximately what percentage of your budget you had saved a head of time, and how much of that was covered by your work while on the road. I’m thinking of taking off in about 2-3 years (yes I know it’s a long time)

    • ShannonOD July 12, 2012 at 8:40 pm #

      It is really heartening to hear you say that Renata, thank you! I had about 45 percent of my budget saved ahead of time. But I also had a guaranteed client for the rest of the money (I still work for the company even), so in that way I left very sure of my work and travel. Two-three years out should hopefully be a good long time so you can save up and have a nice cushion if you also plan to work as you travel. Good luck planning and keep in touch! :)

  17. Sophia April 17, 2012 at 7:43 am #

    That’s some great information you have shared with us. Travel needs funds and your information is really very helpful for us. I’m looking forward to more updates. Keep them coming!
     

  18. Liz March 6, 2012 at 1:14 am #

    This is so helpful. I now (as I’m sure many do) take advantage of iphone budgeting apps – CashTrails is my favorite for traveling, but I’m trying to estimate how much to plan on needing as I get ready to hit the road in a few months. Thanks so much! Maybe I’ll see you in a random country this year!

    • ShannonOD March 6, 2012 at 10:32 pm #

      I haven’t used the CashTrails app, but I do love my iPhone, so I’ll check it out. Also, for budgeting, Jodi at Legal Nomads collected all of the various budgeting posts from travel bloggers and has the budget links broken down by region/county — could prove useful for planning! 
      http://www.legalnomads.com/wds

      • Liz March 7, 2012 at 1:53 am #

         WOW! What a wealth of information she packed into that page!!! So grateful you shared :) Thank you so very much!

  19. Ray February 15, 2012 at 12:10 am #

    When we are planing to travel  then managing the fund for travel is really a daunting task. How you manage this.You have explain this in this.I’ve recommended this blog to some of my colleagues. I’m sure they’ll find it is useful as I did.

    • Anonymous February 15, 2012 at 2:23 am #

      I work on the road, while I am traveling, so it’s hard to give specific tips on managing it, but the best idea is just to start saving, then travel within your comfort bracket until it runs out! :)

  20. Ellen February 14, 2012 at 10:27 pm #

    Well written article.I really appreciate your writing skills.Its great.You have done a good job by sharing this post with us.I would like to read your more updates.Keep in touch with us in future too.

  21. Hey December 12, 2011 at 3:03 pm #

    Not as expensive as one would think. What resources did you use to book your RTW plane tickets? Kayak, Travelocity, STA, etc…?

    • Shannon December 12, 2011 at 11:46 pm #

      Kayak is a favorite of mine, but if I am in Asia I like to check SkyScanner.com since they include some of the smaller local carriers in this area. Also, if I was booking a one-way to a nearby country (say Thailand to India) I checked some of the discount airlines! Hope that helps, happy planning :)

  22. Nicfreeman.com November 1, 2011 at 5:41 am #

    Hey Shannon, Thanks so much for sharing this! I’m currently planning a 9 month trip to Europe and appreciate the budgeting insights. No matter how much I read, I find there will always be that niggling uncertainty before leaving for a big trip – can I afford it? But, like you said, using spreadsheets and keeping an overall idea of spendings is a great way to keep it under control.

    • Anonymous November 2, 2011 at 2:09 am #

      So glad the budget has helped — definitely keep track of your expenses and move slowly, those are the two biggest ways to keep it all in check. Transportation adds up (and gets stressful) so if you can find more budget friendly destinations and stay for a week there, then a few days in the more expensive ones it should help! Best of luck and safe travels :)

  23. Rebecca August 18, 2011 at 4:21 am #

    WHERE did you find such cheap flights? I can’t find a flight across North America for less than $500!

    • Anonymous August 20, 2011 at 4:35 pm #

      Hi Rebecca! Cheap flights are the golden nugget, and they are hard to find, but I use a couple different options:

      – Fly on a Tuesday or Saturday night
      – Fly in and out of hub cities with the major airlines, then take the discounts to where you need to go (can save hundreds)
      – Use a discount airlines…love this master list: http://www.airninja.com

      That’s about it, I hunt around a lot and research a good deal! Hope that helps :)

      • Rebecca August 22, 2011 at 2:46 pm #

        I’ll keep that in mind! Thanks for the tips! :)

  24. David William July 19, 2011 at 6:57 pm #

    This is insanely inspiring. Gosh, really freakin cool! I will do something like this for my trip. Thanks for your openness too!

    • Anonymous July 20, 2011 at 5:06 am #

      You’re welcome! If you ever need any help, I am here just shoot me an email and we can sort out the budgeting and planning  :)

  25. Gemma July 7, 2011 at 7:06 am #

    Hi, just wondering how central america added up? im going there in January and trying to work out a daily budget.. many thanks Gemma

    • Anonymous July 7, 2011 at 4:58 pm #

      Central America is incredibly budget and you can do it for a similar budget
      as SEA… I stayed in private rooms in a hostel a lot for about $10 to $12 a
      night, it’s half that for dorms. Then food is cheap if you eat local foods.
      What I found in Central America is that you can spend more if you choose to
      upgrade – ie. there are chicken buses for dirt cheap or you can upgrade to
      the private bus…one costs $3 and the other $15…seems like not too much
      of a splurge but can add up. So, that being said, you can go uber cheap and
      affordably upgrade when you need a bit of extra comfort :) Hope that helps.
      Email me if you have some specific questions I can help out with!

  26. ShannonOD March 10, 2010 at 6:13 am #

    You are most welcome Mike! Glad that you're finding it handy :-) If you ever
    have any questions as you prep for your trip don't hesitate to shoot me an
    email! Cheers and happy planning :-)

  27. Mike March 9, 2010 at 2:50 am #

    I am in awe of this spreadsheet. I am leaving in October for a RTW trip and this will be most helpful. You've also given me budget ideas because you traveled to a lot of the same countries I'm planning to visit. Thanks!

    • ShannonOD March 10, 2010 at 1:13 pm #

      You are most welcome Mike! Glad that you're finding it handy :-) If you ever
      have any questions as you prep for your trip don't hesitate to shoot me an
      email! Cheers and happy planning :-)

  28. Mike March 8, 2010 at 7:50 pm #

    I am in awe of this spreadsheet. I am leaving in October for a RTW trip and this will be most helpful. You've also given me budget ideas because you traveled to a lot of the same countries I'm planning to visit. Thanks!

  29. RTW360 March 3, 2010 at 3:44 am #

    Hi Shannon, Thanks for sharing your experience and all this info.
    I just found your site a couple of days ago and I intend to read it all.
    Me and my husband decided this year to take our own RTW trip and the amount of things I have in my to do list is quite overwhelming (the plan is to leave in June). Sites like yours help a lot and cut on the research time.
    At this point my two major concerns are: 1. Do we have enough money to follow through? 2. What I am going to say that work and what is going to be of my career after that? I am 30, so so it is not like I am only 20 or I am high up already and a couple of months will not make a difference, but well… If it is hard now to take the time, I am sure it will just get harder with time, as responsibilities growth at an unfair pace.
    Me and my husband have $30K saved up for the trip and the plan is to spend about 2 months in Southeast Asia, 2 months in Africa and 2 months in Europe (hopefully less from my side as things get more expensive and I have been there already, but my hubby really wants to cover some ground). Do you think that is enough? I was looking at RTW ticket and I am wondering if it is worthwhile. It is more than I first hoped for and reading your blog I am tempted to do the acquisition on my own as you did. My only concern is that flight tickets seem to be a big cost in my budget and I am afraid that not getting deals during the trip may have an impact difficult to predict at this point on our budget. Any thoughts? Did you change date or destinations based on the best deal you could get on flights? Again, thanks for all the information here.

  30. RTW360 March 2, 2010 at 8:44 pm #

    Hi Shannon, Thanks for sharing your experience and all this info.
    I just found your site a couple of days ago and I intend to read it all.
    Me and my husband decided this year to take our own RTW trip and the amount of things I have in my to do list is quite overwhelming (the plan is to leave in June). Sites like yours help a lot and cut on the research time.
    At this point my two major concerns are: 1. Do we have enough money to follow through? 2. What I am going to say that work and what is going to be of my career after that? I am 30, so so it is not like I am only 20 or I am high up already and a couple of months will not make a difference, but well… If it is hard now to take the time, I am sure it will just get harder with time, as responsibilities growth at an unfair pace.
    Me and my husband have $30K saved up for the trip and the plan is to spend about 2 months in Southeast Asia, 2 months in Africa and 2 months in Europe (hopefully less from my side as things get more expensive and I have been there already, but my hubby really wants to cover some ground). Do you think that is enough? I was looking at RTW ticket and I am wondering if it is worthwhile. It is more than I first hoped for and reading your blog I am tempted to do the acquisition on my own as you did. My only concern is that flight tickets seem to be a big cost in my budget and I am afraid that not getting deals during the trip may have an impact difficult to predict at this point on our budget. Any thoughts? Did you change date or destinations based on the best deal you could get on flights? Again, thanks for all the information here.

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